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Although nobody shares their private keys, I have seen so many people sharing their wallet information, bitcoin transaction ids, amounts transferred and to which exchanges/wallets and so much of information related to what they are doing with bitcoins.

Can this lead to any privacy or security breach to the respective owners or the bitcoin ethics/security?

  • This may be a better question for meta, do you agree it should be moved? – MeshCollider Dec 22 '17 at 4:14
  • I'm ok with that. Does it remove the post from here? I felt like meta is a more generic one. – SajithP Dec 22 '17 at 4:19
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    I disagree. The question could be rephrased as "What information is safe to share on a public forum and what are the consequences of sharing it". This way it is much on point with Bitcoin and not specific to SE. – sanket1729 Dec 22 '17 at 4:20
  • @sanket1729 both should happen TBH. The question, as it exists, should be moved to Meta. – Qix Dec 22 '17 at 4:24
  • Keep in mind that it's HNQ now. (That would either speed up or delay a decision.) – wizzwizz4 Dec 22 '17 at 9:09
  • I think this is a main site question first, then if we feel like we need a policy, we can post again here in meta. I personally favor no policy on this issue. If you want to dox yourself, go for it. We're not your mama. – 4276 Dec 22 '17 at 19:32
  • The Stack Exchange sites are not forums (see e.g. meta.stackexchange.com/a/92115) (fora?). They are think tanks (ref. meta.stackoverflow.com/a/325681). – Peter Mortensen Dec 24 '17 at 10:24
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Well yes and no. Sharing an address here could link that address to your account, yes. But there is also no way to be sure someone owns an address just because they post it here. If people share information publicly on a site like this, we assume they do not mind it being public knowledge (although it also has an impact on the privacy of those who they send the coins to, etc.)

Sharing an address here doesn't compromise the security of that address though, only privacy

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    Privacy is generally considered part of security. I think what you mean to say that the publication of walled IDs doesn't violate their integrity which is also part of the concept of security. – David Foerster Dec 22 '17 at 13:08
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    Yeah I mean security in the sense of protecting private keys from being stolen, etc – MeshCollider Dec 23 '17 at 6:24
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Note that all of the information you're asking about -- your wallet id, transaction ids, and amounts involved in those transactions -- is already public knowledge, because it's stored in the blockchain. All you're doing is attaching a name to it: the question is, are you comfortable with doing that? If not, perhaps you should consider posting anonymously.

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    Note address is usually different from Wallet ID, wallet ID is generally a term used by online wallets such as blockchain.info to log in, and should not be shared – MeshCollider Dec 22 '17 at 19:08
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Rule number 1 - Do not share your private keys anywhere.

Rule number 2 - FOllow Rule number 1.

Access to your private keys = Access to your coins.

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