17

It seems clear to me that questions about alternatives that are as similar to Bitcoin as Namecoin are clearly on-topic here. I think comparisons are inevitable to far-less-similar systems, and I think those are also clearly on-topic. But I don't know about a question about details of e.g. the Open Transactions system. To the extent that the bitcoin ...


12

Reading the comments, HedgeMage closed it for two reasons. One was that it is too localized (in time) and the other was that it is too basic. I know that we have a lot of other questions that are just as localized and just as basic as this one so I agree with reopening it. I think that it is important though that the answers should not just be a list of ...


10

It's far more important that the title clearly explain what the question is and, together with the tags, allow a person to determine if they're likely to be able to answer the question. Putting the title in the form of a question helps to ensure that, but if you can do it another way, there's nothing wrong with that. Your first example shows, I think, the ...


10

If anything, I think this proposal should've been shortened to "Crypto-currency". I'd appreciate Robert explaining why it was changed back to "Bitcoin", which seems to me to have a significantly reduced scope.


8

On first take, they appear to have no long-term value: they could quickly become obsolete this isn't a problem that anyone is looking to solve So I'd tend to close them as "Not constructive."


7

I was one of the people that recommended that the scope be enlarged to all crypto-currencies, but not all "alternative currencies". I think all crypto-currency questions are pretty on topic. I guess we will cross the bridge about what to do with the site if bitcoin is eclipsed by a different cryptocurrency if/when we come to it.


6

I agree that quick answer acceptance is bad. Particularly with Bitcoin vs. say programming, many people have fundamental misunderstandings about it, and it is diffeacult to tell the difference without already knowing the answer. With programming questions, usually you confirm the correctness of the answer in your own code before marking the answer correct. ...


5

What could be a bigger question for a business considering adopting Bitcoins than how effective it has been for other companies that have done so? I agree that open-ended, vague, or fixed in time questions aren't constructive. But a more focused question like "Did Meza Grill experience an increase in business when they started accepting Bitcoins?" seems both ...


4

Questions like that are generally discouraged across Stack Exchange. The Q&A model here isn't really built to handle recommendations well. This is why you tend to see requests like "please post one [thing] per answer". Another issue is that questions like this tend to attract answers that are often just links and don't offer any additional information. ...


4

Having 96% of your questions answered is commendable, but nobody likes to see questions unanswered. It provides a bad experience for the author and anyone who finds this site seeking the information. So, yes, that is always a good place to put a bit of extra effort; to get those unanswered questions answered.


4

Are questions about other crypto-currencies on-topic? Not any more. Since about 1st July 2019 the scope has been narrowed to Bitcoin only. See Proposed Timeline for Scope Change Proposal: Narrow topic of Bitcoin.Stackexchange to questions applicable to Bitcoin


3

Well, the basics are always a good place to start: "What is GLBSE", "How do I use GLBSE" etc. It is one of the more interesting topics but unfortunately so few people use it or know about it that most don't even know the questions to ask. I'm sure even posting an intro question or two will spark others to look into it and ask more questions though.


3

Making this site about other crypto-currencies was proposed, and I think it is very valid: It will open up the site to more people. It will broaden the perspective for the development of each form of crypto-currency.


3

You should feel free to do any edit that you think improves a question. If a title is better as a question, edit it - the op shouldn't mind.


3

I would suggest that for a user unfamiliar with C++, and even with the codebase in question, it is kind of a stretch to ask them to use code search to find something when they don't have any idea what the code might look like. But I also question the user's motives in asking this - if the user is not a programmer, what problem are they actually trying to ...


3

If they are legitimate, original questions we should answer them. However, those "flag" words should be edited out of the title and body of the question. New users don't realize that they only distract from the question they are asking. Most of these questions, however, tend to be duplicates of our canonical questions. In this case, marking them as a ...


2

I think we should create a couple token questions on a few subjects that come up if the questions we have so far on the same subject are too localized. For example, there are two questions on synchronizing with the network and downloading a blockchain [1], [2], both being a bit localized with their back story and answers that cover part of the problems a ...


2

These questions don't work well with our format: They break the "duplicate" process, and especially cause problems when they get great partial answers. Please DON'T ANSWER all questions in one answer post. You will be duplicating work, and produce content that will be useful to very few people. Most likely your post will be deleted and your effort wasted. ...


2

As long as the question is finite and answerable and actually pertains to Bitcoin it should be on-scope here. We would prefer questions that can be phrased in the question area itself rather than simply linking to an external source and saying "is this accurate" since we have no control over external sources and whether they remain available or not. If your ...


1

I personally would welcome such questions on Bitcoin SE, as it is easy to have misconceptions about how Bitcoin works and there don't appear to be any way to peer-review Bitcoin-related papers in a away that would be meaningful to the community. The Bitcoin forum would be too unmoderated to function properly in this manner, whereas the Stack Exchange offers ...


1

Well, seeing that our answer ratio is 2.2, whereas 2.5+ is a desired ratio, giving more answers in general is useful. The open questions in particular are a good place to start, as any additional input would be appreciated by the authors of the questions.


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